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The Future for Renewable Energy Developers: Trends & Innovations


The Future for Renewable Energy Developers: Trends & Innovations  The future of renewable energy is a dynamic landscape, teeming with exciting prospects and groundbreaking innovations for the enterprising clean energy developer. As we stand on the precipice of 2024, the world of renewable energy is set to undergo significant transformations, driven by a multitude of emerging trends. Advanced photovoltaics, artificial intelligence, and big data are revamping the solar industry, while innovative advancements in battery technology are revolutionizing energy storage.  The Rise of Renewable Energy The historical rise of renewable energy is a story of innovation, resilience, and an enduring commitment to a sustainable future. The journey began as far back as 200 BC with the advent of waterwheels. By the 1860s, the world had witnessed its first solar energy system, and by 1876, it was proven that sunlight could be converted into electricity.   However, the real surge in renewable energy development coincided with the energy crises of the 1970s. This period sparked significant investments in renewables from countries like the United States. Patterns of energy consumption began to shift, and the escalating costs of conventional energy sources played a major role in propelling the growth of renewables.   Fast forward to today, and the growth of renewable energy continues to accelerate at an unprecedented rate. According to the International Energy Agency, renewables are set to account for almost 95% of the increase in global power capacity through 2026, with solar photovoltaics (PV) alone providing more than half.   As of 2020, renewables made up 19.8 percent of electricity generation globally, with hydro and wind making up the majority. This figure is expected to rise to 35 percent by 2030. Moreover, the market share of solar and wind in global electricity generation grew at a compound average annual growth rate of 15% from 2015-2020.   This exponential growth underscores the increasing recognition of renewable energy's pivotal role in mitigating climate change, securing energy independence, and fostering economic growth. As we look ahead, the continued advancement and adoption of renewable energy technologies by renewable developers promise a greener, more sustainable future.  Types of Renewable Energy Renewable energy is a wide and diverse field, encompassing various types each with its own unique characteristics, usage, and potential.   Solar energy is one of the most prominent forms of renewable energy. It involves harnessing the power of the sun to generate electricity. This can be achieved through solar photovoltaic (PV) technology, which converts sunlight directly into electricity, or concentrating solar power (CSP), which uses heat from the sun to drive an electric generator. As of 2023, solar energy accounts for about 3.4% of the electricity generated in the U.S., an increase from 2.8% in 2021. The potential for solar energy is vast, as the amount of sunlight that reaches Earth each day is about 200,000 times the world's total daily electric-generating capacity.   Wind energy is another key player in the renewable energy sector. It utilizes wind turbines to convert kinetic energy from the wind into mechanical energy, which is then transformed into electrical energy. In 2020, wind energy provided about 8.4% of total U.S. electricity generation, making it the largest renewable source in the country. The potential for wind energy is immense, particularly offshore where wind speeds are higher and more consistent.   Hydroelectric power, often referred to as hydro, is the most mature and widely used form of renewable energy. It involves harnessing the energy from moving water to generate electricity. As of 2020, hydro accounted for approximately 6.6% of total U.S. electricity generation and 38% of electricity generation from renewables. The potential for hydroelectric power varies globally, depending on geographical and climatic conditions.   Geothermal energy involves tapping into the Earth's internal heat to generate electricity and heat buildings. While it currently makes up a small percentage of the global power generation, it is viewed as a significant potential renewable energy source due to its ability to provide base-load power.   Bio-energy, or biofuel, is derived from organic materials such as plant and animal waste. It can be used to generate electricity, produce heat, and fuel vehicles. As of 2020, bioenergy accounted for about 4.5% of total U.S. electricity generation. The potential for bio-energy is substantial, particularly in regions with abundant biomass resources.   Technological Innovations in Renewable Energy The renewable energy sector has seen remarkable advancements in recent years, with solar, wind, and hydro technologies leading the way in opportunities for renewable energy development companies.   In the realm of solar energy, one of the most significant advancements has been in solar cell efficiency. Solar technology has achieved a 31.6% conversion rate, a significant leap from past figures. This improvement is largely due to the development of bifacial solar panels, which absorb sunlight from both sides, enhancing their energy production. Furthermore, an emerging class of solar energy technology, made with perovskite semiconductors, has passed the long-sought milestone of a 30-year lifetime. This not only enhances the longevity of solar panels but also increases their cost-effectiveness.   Wind energy too has seen its share of innovations. For example, the development of larger and more efficient wind turbines has significantly increased the amount of electricity that can be generated from wind. Additionally, advancements in offshore wind technology have opened up new possibilities for wind energy generation. The world's largest offshore wind farm, Hornsea 1 in the UK, can power over one million homes. Such large-scale projects underscore the potential of wind energy as a major contributor to global electricity supply.   Hydroelectric power, although a mature technology, is also seeing some exciting developments. For instance, advancements in turbine technology have improved the efficiency and environmental impact of hydro plants. Micro-hydro systems, which generate power without the need for large dams, are becoming increasingly popular in remote communities. Furthermore, pumped storage hydropower, a type of grid energy storage, has gained attention as a method to balance supply and demand on the electric grid.   These advancements highlight the rapid pace of innovation in the renewable energy sector. As technology continues to advance, renewable energy sources like solar, wind, and hydro are poised to play an increasingly important role in our energy landscape.  Future Trends in Renewable Energy The future of renewable energy is looking increasingly bright, with several key trends shaping its trajectory. One way to summarize these emerging trends is the 3 D's: Digitalization, Decarbonization, and Decentralization.   Digitalization refers to the use of advanced technologies like AI, machine learning, renewables software, and IoT to optimize renewable energy systems. This could involve everything from predictive maintenance of wind turbines to smart grids that adapt to changes in renewable energy supply and demand.   Decarbonization reflects a global shift away from fossil fuels towards low-carbon energy sources. The commitment of twenty-five utilities to either an 80% carbon reduction or an 80% share of clean generation by 2030 underscores this trend. In addition, the rising cost of carbon, driven by policy measures and societal demand for climate action, could further accelerate the shift to renewables.   Decentralization involves shifting away from large, centralized power plants to distributed energy resources like rooftop solar panels and local wind turbines. This not only reduces transmission losses but also increases resilience against power outages.   Looking at specific renewable energy technologies, advanced photovoltaics (PV) are expected to play a significant role in the future of renewable energy. Innovations in PV technology are improving efficiency and reducing costs, making solar power increasingly competitive with traditional energy sources.   Offshore wind energy is also set to increase its share, with larger and more efficient turbines being deployed in deeper waters. Meanwhile, green hydrogen, produced using renewable electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen, is expected to grow as a versatile energy carrier and storage medium.   These trends collectively indicate a promising future for renewable energy, with increased deployment, technological advancements, and cost reductions all contributing to the sector's growth. As we move forward, renewable energy is poised to play an increasingly important role in global energy systems, driving progress towards a sustainable and low-carbon future.  Challenges and Solutions  Renewable energy developers face numerous challenges, ranging from technological hurdles to policy obstacles. One of the most significant challenges is the intermittent and variable nature of renewable energy sources. Solar and wind power, for instance, depend on weather conditions, which can fluctuate widely. This creates difficulties in ensuring a reliable, constant supply of energy.   The need for efficient, affordable, and reliable energy storage also poses a challenge. While advancements have been made in battery technology, storing energy for use when renewable sources aren't available remains a significant issue. This is particularly relevant for solar energy, which can't be produced during night-time hours, and wind energy, which is dependent on wind availability.   Reliance on novel technologies can also be a risk for renewable energy projects. New technologies often lack a track record of performance and could face unforeseen technical issues. This can make it difficult for projects to secure financing, as investors may perceive them as risky.   In addition, the transition towards renewable energy involves a shift away from traditional energy infrastructure, which can be challenging. Existing grids may not be equipped to handle the variable output from renewable sources, and upgrading these grids can be costly.   Policy hurdles also pose significant challenges. The development and deployment of renewable energy technologies often depend on supportive government policies and regulatory frameworks. Changes in these policies can therefore have a significant impact on the sector.   Lastly, there is an urgent need for digital transformation in the renewable energy sector, and developers would be wise to utilize tools and software for renewable energy. Energy analytics software solutions can help address some of the challenges faced by renewable energy developers, such as managing the intermittent nature of renewable power and optimizing grid integration.    Despite these challenges, the power and renewables sector continues to grow and evolve, driven by advancements in technology, efforts from the largest renewable energy developers, decreasing costs, and increasing recognition of the need to transition to a more sustainable energy system.  To learn more about LandGate’s renewable energy software solution and energy data analytics software for green energy developers, click here or book a demo with our dedicated energy markets team.


The future of renewable energy is a dynamic landscape, teeming with exciting prospects and groundbreaking innovations for the enterprising clean energy developer. As we stand on the precipice of 2024, the world of renewable energy is set to undergo significant transformations, driven by a multitude of emerging trends. Advanced photovoltaics, artificial intelligence, and big data are revamping the solar industry, while innovative advancements in battery technology are revolutionizing energy storage.



The Rise of Renewable Energy


The historical rise of renewable energy is a story of innovation, resilience, and an enduring commitment to a sustainable future. The journey began as far back as 200 BC with the advent of waterwheels. By the 1860s, the world had witnessed its first solar energy system, and by 1876, it was proven that sunlight could be converted into electricity.



However, the real surge in renewable energy development coincided with the energy crises of the 1970s. This period sparked significant investments in renewables from countries like the United States. Patterns of energy consumption began to shift, and the escalating costs of conventional energy sources played a major role in propelling the growth of renewables.



Fast forward to today, and the growth of renewable energy continues to accelerate at an unprecedented rate. According to the International Energy Agency, renewables are set to account for almost 95% of the increase in global power capacity through 2026, with solar photovoltaics (PV) alone providing more than half.



As of 2020, renewables made up 19.8 percent of electricity generation globally, with hydro and wind making up the majority. This figure is expected to rise to 35 percent by 2030. Moreover, the market share of solar and wind in global electricity generation grew at a compound average annual growth rate of 15% from 2015-2020.



This exponential growth underscores the increasing recognition of renewable energy's pivotal role in mitigating climate change, securing energy independence, and fostering economic growth. As we look ahead, the continued advancement and adoption of renewable energy technologies by renewable developers promise a greener, more sustainable future.



Types of Renewable Energy


Renewable energy is a wide and diverse field, encompassing various types each with its own unique characteristics, usage, and potential.



Solar energy is one of the most prominent forms of renewable energy. It involves harnessing the power of the sun to generate electricity. This can be achieved through solar photovoltaic (PV) technology, which converts sunlight directly into electricity, or concentrating solar power (CSP), which uses heat from the sun to drive an electric generator. As of 2023, solar energy accounts for about 3.4% of the electricity generated in the U.S., an increase from 2.8% in 2021. The potential for solar energy is vast, as the amount of sunlight that reaches Earth each day is about 200,000 times the world's total daily electric-generating capacity.



Wind energy is another key player in the renewable energy sector. It utilizes wind turbines to convert kinetic energy from the wind into mechanical energy, which is then transformed into electrical energy. In 2020, wind energy provided about 8.4% of total U.S. electricity generation, making it the largest renewable source in the country. The potential for wind energy is immense, particularly offshore where wind speeds are higher and more consistent.



Hydroelectric power, often referred to as hydro, is the most mature and widely used form of renewable energy. It involves harnessing the energy from moving water to generate electricity. As of 2020, hydro accounted for approximately 6.6% of total U.S. electricity generation and 38% of electricity generation from renewables. The potential for hydroelectric power varies globally, depending on geographical and climatic conditions.



Geothermal energy involves tapping into the Earth's internal heat to generate electricity and heat buildings. While it currently makes up a small percentage of the global power generation, it is viewed as a significant potential renewable energy source due to its ability to provide base-load power.



Bio-energy, or biofuel, is derived from organic materials such as plant and animal waste. It can be used to generate electricity, produce heat, and fuel vehicles. As of 2020, bioenergy accounted for about 4.5% of total U.S. electricity generation. The potential for bio-energy is substantial, particularly in regions with abundant biomass resources.




Technological Innovations in Renewable Energy


The renewable energy sector has seen remarkable advancements in recent years, with solar, wind, and hydro technologies leading the way in opportunities for renewable energy development companies.



In the realm of solar energy, one of the most significant advancements has been in solar cell efficiency. Solar technology has achieved a 31.6% conversion rate, a significant leap from past figures. This improvement is largely due to the development of bifacial solar panels, which absorb sunlight from both sides, enhancing their energy production. Furthermore, an emerging class of solar energy technology, made with perovskite semiconductors, has passed the long-sought milestone of a 30-year lifetime. This not only enhances the longevity of solar panels but also increases their cost-effectiveness.



Wind energy too has seen its share of innovations. For example, the development of larger and more efficient wind turbines has significantly increased the amount of electricity that can be generated from wind. Additionally, advancements in offshore wind technology have opened up new possibilities for wind energy generation. The world's largest offshore wind farm, Hornsea 1 in the UK, can power over one million homes. Such large-scale projects underscore the potential of wind energy as a major contributor to global electricity supply.



Hydroelectric power, although a mature technology, is also seeing some exciting developments. For instance, advancements in turbine technology have improved the efficiency and environmental impact of hydro plants. Micro-hydro systems, which generate power without the need for large dams, are becoming increasingly popular in remote communities. Furthermore, pumped storage hydropower, a type of grid energy storage, has gained attention as a method to balance supply and demand on the electric grid.



These advancements highlight the rapid pace of innovation in the renewable energy sector. As technology continues to advance, renewable energy sources like solar, wind, and hydro are poised to play an increasingly important role in our energy landscape.



Future Trends in Renewable Energy


The future of renewable energy is looking increasingly bright, with several key trends shaping its trajectory. One way to summarize these emerging trends is the 3 D's: Digitalization, Decarbonization, and Decentralization.



Digitalization refers to the use of advanced technologies like AI, machine learning, renewables software, and IoT to optimize renewable energy systems. This could involve everything from predictive maintenance of wind turbines to smart grids that adapt to changes in renewable energy supply and demand.



Decarbonization reflects a global shift away from fossil fuels towards low-carbon energy sources. The commitment of twenty-five utilities to either an 80% carbon reduction or an 80% share of clean generation by 2030 underscores this trend. In addition, the rising cost of carbon, driven by policy measures and societal demand for climate action, could further accelerate the shift to renewables.



Decentralization involves shifting away from large, centralized power plants to distributed energy resources like rooftop solar panels and local wind turbines. This not only reduces transmission losses but also increases resilience against power outages.



Looking at specific renewable energy technologies, advanced photovoltaics (PV) are expected to play a significant role in the future of renewable energy. Innovations in PV technology are improving efficiency and reducing costs, making solar power increasingly competitive with traditional energy sources.



Offshore wind energy is also set to increase its share, with larger and more efficient turbines being deployed in deeper waters. Meanwhile, green hydrogen, produced using renewable electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen, is expected to grow as a versatile energy carrier and storage medium.



These trends collectively indicate a promising future for renewable energy, with increased deployment, technological advancements, and cost reductions all contributing to the sector's growth. As we move forward, renewable energy is poised to play an increasingly important role in global energy systems, driving progress towards a sustainable and low-carbon future.



screenshot of landgate solar infrastructure data



Challenges and Solutions for Renewable Energy Developers


Renewable energy developers face numerous challenges, ranging from technological hurdles to policy obstacles. One of the most significant challenges is the intermittent and variable nature of renewable energy sources. Solar and wind power, for instance, depend on weather conditions, which can fluctuate widely. This creates difficulties in ensuring a reliable, constant supply of energy.



The need for efficient, affordable, and reliable energy storage also poses a challenge. While advancements have been made in battery technology, storing energy for use when renewable sources aren't available remains a significant issue. This is particularly relevant for solar energy, which can't be produced during night-time hours, and wind energy, which is dependent on wind availability.



Reliance on novel technologies can also be a risk for renewable energy projects. New technologies often lack a track record of performance and could face unforeseen technical issues. This can make it difficult for projects to secure financing, as investors may perceive them as risky.



In addition, the transition towards renewable energy involves a shift away from traditional energy infrastructure, which can be challenging. Existing grids may not be equipped to handle the variable output from renewable sources, and upgrading these grids can be costly.



Policy hurdles also pose significant challenges. The development and deployment of renewable energy technologies often depend on supportive government policies and regulatory frameworks. Changes in these policies can therefore have a significant impact on the sector.



Lastly, there is an urgent need for digital transformation in the renewable energy sector, and developers would be wise to utilize tools and software for renewable energy. Energy analytics software solutions can help address some of the challenges faced by renewable energy developers, such as managing the intermittent nature of renewable power and optimizing grid integration. 



Despite these challenges, the power and renewables sector continues to grow and evolve, driven by advancements in technology, efforts from the largest renewable energy developers, decreasing costs, and increasing recognition of the need to transition to a more sustainable energy system.


To learn more about LandGate’s renewable energy software solution and energy data analytics software for green energy developers, click here or book a demo with our dedicated energy markets team.


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